Introduction to Bryophytes

Bryophytes are mosses, liverworts and hornworts, and they are an amazing part of natural history. However, many people don’t know that, so this is why you should become interested in Bryophytes:

  • They are rather unrecorded. It is so easy  just to note the bryophytes you see on a short walk that it is hard to believe how few people actually do it. With a better understanding of them, they will be easier to conserve.
  • They can be found nearly anywhere! On trees, walls, houses, all over the place, even one or two on cars and underwater!
  • There are so many species! There are only 4 species of Hornwort, but you can find 763 species of mosses in the UK and nearly 300 Liverworts. Bryophytes love wet climates so that’s why Britain has about two-thirds of all European species!
  • Unlike some species which can only be studied some parts of the year, Bryophytes can be studied year-round. It is probably even easier to find Bryophytes in winter as they are much less likely to be covered by large plants!

I’ve only found 32 species so far and some can be quite difficult to ID, especially Sphagnums (bog mosses), therefore I recommend buying the British Bryological Society’s Field Guide for UK and Ireland. It can help you identify most of the species you find and has been put together by ‘a team of expert bryologists’. It includes keys, photographs, similar species, colour coding, drawings of key features etc.

It is easy to get started with finding Bryophytes, there isn’t too much equipment involved. The only thing beginners really need is a good hand lens but don’t worry if you don’t have that just yet, many species can be easily identified with the naked eye. I would suggest starting in your own garden, big or small, as there is bound to be many easy species there and is a good way to practise. But most of all: enjoy it!

Dotted Thyme-moss

Dotted Thyme-moss

Urn Haircap, my 32nd species

Urn Haircap, my 32nd species