Ouzels and Sprites

Last weekend was a great one for birding. Saturday started drizzly and it continued like that for the rest of the day, but when I saw news of a Yellow-browed Warbler just 10 minutes away I couldn’t resist going for this scarce vagrant. When we arrived at Bewbush West Playing Fields it was cloudy and miserable. We could tell that this wasn’t the most likely destination for most birders, it was simply a few football pitches, a tiny section of woodland and a hedgerow.

We followed a footpath adjacent to the playing fields, as that was where the Yellow-browed Warbler was seen. Along the whole route I played the call of this species, hoping that the lost bird would call back and reveal its presence. We had no luck for the first fifteen minutes, with only Blue Tits and Robins calling from the trees. However, as we reached a large, dense, berry-laden Hawthorn bush, my mum and I both heard the call. ‘Tseeweest, tseeweest’. That was the bird! I played back the call several times and received a couple more faint responses, but that was it. There was no sign of the bird, it was obviously well hidden inside the dark, dark hedge.

Yellow-browed Warblers are birds that breed in Siberia and winter in South-east Asia, but hundreds each year perform ‘reverse migration’, that is migrating in the wrong direction, and find themselves here in Britain. This is the perfect time of year for these Siberian ‘sprites’ to turn up on our coasts, with a maximum of 600 on one day earlier this year. All records are pretty much confined to the east coast, however, with few making their way inland. This year has so far been a bumper year for them, with 8 being seen in Surrey at the time of writing. Considering that there haven’t been any confirmed records for at least 2 years this is amazing!

The next day the weather was much more favourable and my dad and I made our way to the brilliant Ashdown Forest to see how Autumn was getting on. There had been 12 Ring Ouzels reported during the last two days and these are another species I had yet to see in Britain and indeed the world. When we arrived in the car park we could simply hear autumn calling from the trees: there were Chaffinches everywhere! Given this being a bumper year for beech mast, one of their favourite foods, I wasn’t too surprised to see lots. However, I think 69 is a pretty good total!

Continuing along the tarmac road I heard a distant Pheasant and party of Blackbirds in a dense holly bush. For a moment I thought I could hear a faint ‘chack’ of a Ring Ouzel, but I couldn’t be sure. Further along the road we came to a more open area with gorse and some isolated pines. Ahead of us on the path we could see a flock of about 20 Chaffinches; however they were very flighty and I couldn’t tell if there were any Brambling among them. It didn’t sound like it, no Brambling calls stood out as the flock flew over our heads and into some tall pines at the bottom of a short slope.

A short while later, as we were under the cover of some tall pines and beech trees again, I spotted a flock of thrush-size birds flying around a small Rowan. They weren’t close and even through my binoculars I couldn’t tell if they were Blackbirds or Ring Ouzels; however it seemed unlikely that Blackbirds would form such a large flock. Retracing our steps we managed to find a path that lead down towards the Rowan for us to get a closer look and confirm the identity of those birds. It was a steep but easy descent, in one place we had to move quickly as we came across a huge Wood Ant nest!

dscn8898

Formica rufa, Southern Wood Ant, nest

The number of birds around us was incredible. A tit flock made their way through the thin birch trees, hanging from the flimsy twigs. It was mainly made up of Long-tailed Tits, however there were also Blue, Coal and Great Tits along with seven Chiffchaffs. Several Redwings passed overhead and there were even more Chaffinches and Goldfinches calling from above.

We soon got to a point where we could see the bush where we had seen the Ring Ouzels feeding. There was clearly a lot of activity on the small Rowan and I was pleased to see, through my binoculars, that they were definitely Ring Ouzels! They were very busy feeding on the ripe red berries, along with many Chaffinches. Three Bramblings were also a nice surprise feeding on the berries, they are my first this winter and always great to see. This year I am trying to attract them in to our garden, but there hasn’t been much luck yet unfortunately.

Ring Ouzels are migrants that breed here in the UK in hilly and mountainous open areas. They don’t usually breed in South-East England so this time of year when they are passing through on their way to their wintering grounds is the best to see them. They are similar in appearance to Blackbirds being primarily black, however the males are easy to tell apart due to the bright white crescent on the breast. All genders and ages have this white crescent however it is duller in the females and especially so in juvenile birds. In cases where the crescent is faint, then the next best method of identification is looking at the wings. In Ring Ouzels, the wing is paler than the rest of the body and almost appears translucent, whereas in Blackbirds they are completely black in the males or uniformly dark brown.

Ring Ouzels are sadly declining in the UK and they have been given the red status. However there isn’t a clear cause of the decline and there are several groups working on researching this species and finding out why populations have decreased so much. However, the least numbers of birds have been recorded after warm summers, suggesting that a lack of food might be the problem. With an ongoing trend of warm weather due to global warming it is likely that the decline will continue.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s