BTO Birdcamp 2017 – Part 1

Last weekend I was incredibly lucky to be able to attend the BTO Bird Camp that took place between 26th-28th May based at the BTO headquarters at The Nunnery in Thetford. For young birders aged between 12 and 18 it is a superb opportunity for the future of birding and ornithology to meet like-minded individuals of the same age and to see some fantastic wildlife.

This series of blog posts will be split into 3 parts as I have a lot to write about! This first part will give an introduction to the Bird Camp – including information about the BTO and the sponsors of the event the Cameron Bespolka Trust – and the first evening. In the second part I will talk about the birds and the moths and in the final part I will talk about the brilliant range of dragonflies, some scarce, that we saw.

I am very grateful to the BTO – British Trust for Ornithology – for organising this event. This is the second year this event has been running, and reading the trip reports from last year’s camp I couldn’t wait to apply and fortunately my application was successful. Along with this event the BTO run many others to develop skills in bird identification and nest recording among others. I believe that these events are really important to ensure that our birds are better understood.

Many of the events that the BTO run are intended to improve the public’s skills in bird surveying, often with a particular survey or census in mind. The BTO run many nationwide surveys to improve the knowledge of Britain’s bird life. These include the Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) and the Wetland Bird Survey (WeBS). The BTO is an excellent organisation without which our ornithological fauna would be less well understood and the Bird Camp would not have taken place.

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One of my Cuckoo photos from Thursley Common a couple of weekends ago. The BTO run a Cuckoo tagging project in order to find out more about the lives of these birds, which you can read about here: https://www.bto.org/science/migration/tracking-studies/cuckoo-tracking

As well as the BTO I am very grateful to the Cameron Bespolka Trust for sponsoring the event. Cameron Bespolka was an enthusiastic young birder who was tragically killed in a skiing accident a few years ago, and the trust was set up in memory of him. The trust’s main aim is to inspire young people to enjoy birds and nature. As well as sponsoring this camp, they have done lots of work here and abroad to help young people get interested in the environment around them. You can read more about Cameron, the trust and their aims on their website: http://www.cameronbespolka.com/

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The camp that I had been looking forward to for so long finally came around last Friday. After a 3-and-a-half hour journey to south Norfolk I arrived at just before 6pm shortly after which we had dinner and an introduction to the camp. We also did a little bit of birding around the Nunnery – we recorded a number of common species such as Jay and singing Blackcap. I even had a brief flight view of a Green Woodpecker and an Oystercatcher flew over as well which I wasn’t expecting. Slightly later on we heard a Tawny Owl respond to Louis Driver’s clever wooden owl whistle!

Most of us had an early night to rest before the 4.30 wake-up some of us had! It was clear that there was lots of great birding to come…