Rutland Water(birds)

On Saturday I was very pleased to be going to Birdfair. Birdfair is the bird enthusiast’s event of the year, taking place at Rutland Water: one of the best birding sites in the Midlands. It was great to meet many new people from the birding community and attend some nice talks and events, however the highlight for me was seeing many amazing birds in the nature reserve.

In the morning, just before lunch, I was able to go to Swarovski tower. The Swarovski tower is where people can go to try out the Swarovski telescopes and it is located in an excellent position overlooking the nature reserve. The telescopes were perfectly positioned; when I looked through the first scope I was amazed to see a pair of Great White Egrets! These are huge white herons which aren’t common in Britain although they have been increasing in numbers. I had only seen 1 before this, read about that one here, so I was very pleased.

The next scope I looked through held another surprise: an Osprey perched on a fence post in the water! Along with the Great White Egret, I had only seen one other Osprey before this one. And my first one was seen flying while travelling along the M23, so these were much better views by comparison! 8 pairs of Ospreys bred at Rutland Water last year, which is a great number considering that they first started breeding here in 2001. Rutland Water is one of the few sites in England where Ospreys breed, with a few pairs breeding in Wales and the main stronghold being in Scotland. You can tell that the Osprey I saw was a male due to the lack of a heavily marked breast band.

I am quite happy with these two photos even though they were taken through the Swarovski telescopes without any digiscoping equipment.

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The pair of Great White Egrets

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The male Osprey. Unfortunately the lack of a breast band can’t be seen in this photo.

Just after lunch I met up with other young birders and naturalists for a walk around the nature reserve, visiting several hides. The first hide we visited was Sandpiper hide. Plover hide overlooks Lagoon 4 which has several scrapes and lots of open water. On the nearest scrape to the hide there were several waders: 2 Lapwings, 2 Common Sandpipers and a single Little Ringed Plover. On the opposite side of the lagoon to the hide was a flock of Great Black-backed Gulls, the largest number I’ve ever seen together. You don’t often see such large aggregations inland at this time of year, however Rutland Water being such a large water body I wasn’t too surprised. Great-black Backed Gulls are one of the more coastal of the large gulls, only really venturing inland during the non-breeding season. The population swells in winter with many tens of thousands of gulls joining the British population. Especially large numbers are found around landfill sites and in roosts at reservoirs.

My favourite hide was Shoveler hide, it was packed with great birds! Living quite far inland, I don’t regularly get the chance to see good numbers of waders. However, at Shoveler hide I had the best views of waders I have had for a very long time! There was a small area of exposed mud right in front of the hide where there were several Greenshanks and Ruffs. Unfortunately the Greenshanks were obscured most of the time by reeds. However the Ruffs moved further away and into the open water where I could watch them clearly. There were also 2 or 3 Black-tailed Godwits feeding, one of the larger wading birds with very long straight bills. About 15 metres away from the hide was the first scrape. There were an impressive number of Green Sandpipers: a group of 5 were sheltering from the wind behind two small metal tanks. Further to the left someone spotted a Wood Sandpiper, one of the species I really wanted to see.

Wood Sandpipers are mainly passage migrants to Britain, meaning that they pass through on migration. A handful of pairs do breed here, however only in the Scottish Highlands. One of the conservation practices taking place to try and boost the breeding population of this bird in Scotland is the re-flooding of previously drained marshes. Wood Sandpipers are very similar to Green Sandpipers although there are several features that can tell them apart. In Green Sandpipers, the brown neck and upper breast ends abruptly and becomes white whereas in the Wood Sandpiper the brown slowly dissipates into the white belly. Also, Wood Sandpipers show many more white spots on the back than Green Sandpiper. The main feature that I use to separate the two species is the eyestripe. The eyestripe in the Wood Sandpiper clearly projects past the eye, however in the Green Sandpiper the white eyestripe is only visible between the bill and the eye.

Below are a few photos I was able to take of the waders at Shoveler hide, again I am quite pleased with them as this time they were only taken through my binoculars!

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A trio of Ruff feeding.

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Wood Sandpiper. In this photo the eyestripe behind the eye is obvious.

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Black-tailed Godwit

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A single Ruff

Once we had made sure there weren’t any real rarities hiding among the waders near to the hide, we switched our attention to the birds beyond the first scrape. There was a plethora of wildfowl: Mallard, Teal, Gadwall, Canada Geese, Greylag Geese and even a pair of Egyptian Geese sat on a metal tank. Amazingly, one of the other young birders managed to spot a distant Marsh Harrier floating above the reeds on the other side of the lagoon before dropping down. It was chocolaty-brown with a cream-coloured cap, meaning that it was a female or a juvenile. Rutland Water has a breeding population of these beautiful birds and some birds also pass through in autumn. It was hard to tell whether this bird was a Rutland Water breeder or a passage migrant because at this stage many different bird species have begun their southward migration although some are still raising their second brood.

Also well-spotted was a group of 4 Red-crested Pochards far out into the lagoon which quickly moved out of sight behind the reeds. Unlike the Marsh Harrier, we couldn’t sex the birds as males resemble females very closely at this time of year as they are moulting. This plumage is called eclipse plumage and can cause identification problems for many birders as males usually look completely different to what they look like for most of the year. These Red-crested Pochards were a new species for me, although I can’t wait to see more again as I would really like to see the males in breeding plumage.

That sums up my account of the young birders walk at BirdFair 2016, I can’t wait for next BirdFair!

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Some of the Young Birders. From left to right – Sophie, Me, Noah, Toby, Eleanor, Ben, Zach, Fin, Ellis, Luke, Harry, Frank, Sam and Jacob.

More Redpoll News!

The Redpoll numbers in our garden have been stable during the past month, if not increasing. On the 12th, Tony Davis came back to our garden to do some more bird ringing and I was really excited to catch the Redpolls that have been visiting the nyger feeder.

Tony set up the Redpoll tape on the speakers, in order to attract them to the net. The session was slow to begin with, but soon enough we had five Redpolls in the net in one go! It was really great ringing what I think is now my favourite bird and we even ringed another orange-capped individual, sadly definitely a Lesser Redpoll this time rather than a Mealy!

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The next Redpoll was just a bit more exciting! It was caught on its own in the net and when Tony said that it already had a ring on, I wasn’t that happy. However, I had rushed to conclusions! All of the Redpoll-sized rings I have used with Tony start with a ‘T’ followed by the numbers, but this one started with a ‘Y’, which meant it hadn’t been ringed by us!

A number of exciting possibilities went through my head. Maybe it was ringed in Russia? Or Estonia? Unfortunately it had the details of the London Natural History Museum on it which means that it was ringed in the UK.

To get the details of where the bird was ringed originally, Tony had to submit the data to the BTO, who would send back the details. It took just over a week to receive the results, which were very interesting!

The bird was originally ringed at Allerthorpe Common, East Riding of Yorkshire, 312 km away from here in Domewood, on the Sussex-Surrey border! Also, it was ringed with the age code ‘3’ on the 24th November 2011! This means that it hatched in the 2011 breeding season as the code ‘3’ means that it hatched during the calendar year it was ringed in.

To sum up, the Lesser Redpoll ‘Y562211’ was ringed 312km away from Domewood, 1580 days before we caught it and it is coming up to its fifth birthday! Lesser Redpolls usually only live to about 2 years old and the maximum recorded age is 6 years, so hopefully we catch this bird again next year!

Part of the Package?

On Sunday the 15th March, I sent off an application to participate in a British Trust for Ornithology survey: Garden BirdWatch. The Garden BirdWatch is an easy to do survey, where participants count the birds in their garden every week and then send the records off at the end of every quarter.

I received the welcome letter and the introduction package on Thursday and I eagerly read through what it contained: information leaflets; a  ‘Garden Birds & Wildlife’ book; welcome letter; example of a paper recording form; ‘Bird Table’ magazine and a quick start guide. Although I didn’t know that I was going to get another gift though…

On Saturday (today) I did a one hour bird watch for the Garden BirdWatch, which was scheduled to begin at 9am and finish 10am. However I chose to start 20 minutes earlier than planned as my gift arrived in the garden; two Goldfinches at the nyger feeder! I haven’t seen a Goldfinch in our garden for around a year even though I recently saw a flock of 50 about 200 metres up the road, and later a group of 20 Chaffinches, 30 Greenfinches and 50 more Goldfinches!

The Goldfinches stayed around for 15 minutes while I counted the other birds and then were spooked by defensive Blue Tits, but they came back for a short visit of 2 minutes in the bushes around the garden and then weren’t seen again for the rest of the count. They are now though, as I write this post, once again being tormented by the local Tits.

I am pretty confident that they are a pair, one has more red on the face than the other and they seem socially close too. One particularly aggressive move from a Great Tit made the two Goldfinches spilt up and scatter, with one closer to the feeder than the other. The closer one returned to the feeder in about 30 seconds, while the other stayed out of sight behind a bush on the other side of the feeding station. They must prefer the company of one another as the one already on the feeder wouldn’t start eating until the other one joined it a few minutes later!

I really hope they stay around, an unusual splash of colour in our garden!

Goldfinches at the nyger feeder!

Goldfinches at the nyger feeder!